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Posted Sun, 19 Mar 2023 19:10:32 GMT by Trencher Tree
I'm at my annual confused stage when it comes to self assessment and pension contributions. Background: Higher rate tax payer, employed, employer has a standard workplace pension with no salary sacrafice. Like many, there are three sources of contributions to my pensions. Below are some annual numbers for illustrative purposes. A. Workplace 3% (employers contribution) £1,984.50 B. Workplace 5% (my contribution) £2,471.26 C. Regular contributions to private pension £28,010.00 When completing my self assessment, I'm looking to confirm what numbers need to be included in the below section as it makes my head spin every year.... Payments to registered pension schemes (Also known as PPR) where basic rate tax relief will be claimed by your pension provider (called Relief at source). Enter the payments and basic rate tax: Is the correct answer: #1. C * 1.25? e.g. £28,010.00 * 1.25 = £35,012.50 #2. C+B * 1.25? e.g. £30,481.26 * 1.25 = £38,101.57 #3. Something else
Posted Thu, 23 Mar 2023 16:40:26 GMT by HMRC Admin 25
Hi Trencher Tree,

It is not clear,based on the information provided, if your employer deducts your pension contributions from your pay before it is taxed.

If that is the case, you will have already received the tax relief you are entitled to, and you won't have to make any entries in the 'Paying into registered pension schemes' section of the SA100.

If not, please follow the detailed guidance in the SA100 notes.

How to fill in your tax return (2022)

Thank you. 
Posted Sat, 25 Mar 2023 20:56:27 GMT by Trencher Tree
Thanks. My workplace pension is relief at source. Option #2 seems to me to be the right answer but I'm not 100% sure.
Posted Thu, 30 Mar 2023 11:47:49 GMT by HMRC Admin 25
Hi Trencher Tree,

Option #2 is correct.

Thank you. 
Posted Thu, 30 Mar 2023 11:58:48 GMT by Trencher Tree
Thank you, most appreciated.
Posted Thu, 30 Mar 2023 17:17:44 GMT by
Hello, I made my contribution to SIPP £2,880 only this week, and the pension provider will only claim the 20% tax relief £720 in late Apr and post it to my account in May. In filing my self assessment tax return 2022-23, shall I put in£2,800 or 3,600?
Posted Thu, 06 Apr 2023 12:57:10 GMT by HMRC Admin 32
Hi,

You claim the amount you put in plus the relief that the pension provider has claimed.

Thank you.
Posted Fri, 07 Apr 2023 17:15:52 GMT by
Dear HMRC, Thanks for the answer. Just to be sure, that means I put in 2,880 only for 2022-23 filing as the pension provider will claim only in late April (which is 2023-24 tax year)?
Posted Sun, 16 Apr 2023 09:38:51 GMT by
Dear HMRC, Can you please kindly confirm: that means I put in 2,880 only for 2022-23 filing as the pension provider will claim only in late April (which is 2023-24 tax year)?
Posted Tue, 18 Apr 2023 09:03:49 GMT by HMRC Admin 8
Hi,
That is correct.
Thank you.
Posted Tue, 18 Apr 2023 11:30:29 GMT by
Dear HMRC, Thanks very much for the answers. As I will contribute in May/2023 again 2,880 for the tax year 23-24 (and the provider will calim in Jun/2023), does it mean my tax filing will be as folows? 2022-23: 2,880 2023-24: 2,880 (May/2023 contribution) + 720 (tax relief claimed by service provider in May/23 for 2022-23 contribution) + 720 (tax relief claimed by service provider in Jun/23 for 2023-24 contribution) = 4,320 So for tax year 2023-24, my contribution to pension including tax claim will be 4,320. Will that cause a violation of the HMRC saying the yearly contributionc cannot be over 3,600 if you've no employment income?
Posted Thu, 20 Apr 2023 12:39:52 GMT by HMRC Admin 25
Hi Christ,
We can comfirm you are correct. 
Thank you. 
Posted Thu, 20 Apr 2023 20:00:48 GMT by
Hello HMRC, Thanks. Your answer "you're correct" means which one below? A, or B, or both? A. My calculation of per year declaration 2022-23 £2,800, 2023-24, £ 4,320 B. I'll have a violation of the HMRC contribution limit of 3,600 in tax year 2023-24?
Posted Fri, 21 Apr 2023 13:18:21 GMT by HMRC Admin 10
Hi
If the contributions will take you over this contact the pension provider before making the payment.
Thankyou.
Posted Thu, 27 Apr 2023 10:37:25 GMT by HMRC Admin 32
Hi Christ,

If the contribution would take you over you will need to discuss this with the pension provider before making the contribution.

Thank you.

 
Posted Mon, 19 Jun 2023 14:45:36 GMT by
Help please! I have not had any income this year but took £12500 out of my pension which I have been taxed for. I'm not sure if I completed the form properly so I can get a refund on my taxes.
Posted Thu, 22 Jun 2023 14:36:46 GMT by HMRC Admin 32
Hi Susan,

If you have submitted the Self Assessment you will need to contact our webchat team to query this.

Self Assessment: general enquiries

Please click on 'Ask HMRC online'

Thank you.
Posted Fri, 28 Jul 2023 14:09:20 GMT by
Hi all I'm a higher rate tax payer and make contributions into my workplace pension. These contributions are taken from my pay before tax and so I understand that I don't need to include these in my self assessment. But it's not clear to me then that I continue to get this benefit when the self-assessment process recalculates tax due based on total earned and doesn't take into account these contributions? Thanks
Posted Fri, 28 Jul 2023 18:19:30 GMT by
What you seem to be describing are net pay contributions and you cannot include these on your Self Assessment return. If your salary was say £50k and you paid 10% in net pay contributions your P60 would show your taxable pay as £45k. You declare the taxable income on your tax return (the £45k in this example) not your salary so they have been taken into account and you wouldn't enter the pension contributions otherwise you would be double counting them.
Posted Tue, 08 Aug 2023 07:53:30 GMT by HMRC Admin 8
Hi,
The calculation would only be based on your taxable income.
The contributions are already taken off to arrive at this figure.
Thank you.

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